Monthly Archives: October 2011

The 10 Major Causes of Leadership Failure

Excerpt from the book “Think and Grow Rich” By Napolean Hill
[1] Inability to Organize Details
[2] Unwillingness to render humble service
[3] Expectation of Pay for what they “Know” Instead of what they Do with what they know
[4] Fear of Competition from followers
[5] Lack of imagination
[6] Selfishness
[7] Intemperance
[8] Disloyalty
[9] Emphasis on the “Authority” of Leadership
[10] Emphasis of Title

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 6

Refer to Part 1 of this series…

In this post, details of the multiple sub-dimensions of T – Talent Acquisition and Development are elaborated.

Talent Acquisition and Development

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 5

Refer to Part 1 of this series…

In this post, details of the multiple sub-dimensions of S – Systems and Processes are elaborated.

System and process

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 4

Refer to Part 1 of this series…

In this post, details of the multiple sub-dimensions of F – Financials are elaborated.

Financial

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 3

Refer to Part 1 of this series…

In this post, details of the multiple sub-dimensions of S – Strategic Orientation are elaborated.

Strategic Orientation

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 2

Refer to Part 1 of this series…

In this post, details of the multiple sub-dimensions of C – Customer Development and Engagement are elaborated.

Customer Development and Enagement

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

CSFST Framework for Captives / Near Captive Units – Part 1

The CSFST framework was developed as the basis for analysis of Indian Captive / Near Captive units.

A Captive Unit refers to a fully owned subsidiary [A subsidiary is a company controlled by another company or corporation, called its parent (or parent organization) which is usually the corporate headquarters] in India. Usually, this unit is dependent on the parent organization for its business, revenues and potential growth. Typically, the parent organization is also the only customer for this unit. In essence, the present and future of this Captive Unit are driven by the parent/customer entity.

An Indian Captive Unit (CU) is a company which has been set-up in India to cater to specific requirements [say IT] of the company head quartered any where across the globe. The primary business of the global major may be IT related (Eg: IBM, Accenture, Google, Yahoo) or non-IT like Banking, Insurance, etc. (Eg: UBS, HSBC, GE). Almost 100% of the business and revenues are obtained from a single customer (also usually the parent).

An Indian IT Near-Captive Unit (NCU) is a company which is registered and head quartered in India; and provides IT services to customers world wide. However a significant portion (>50%) of the business and revenues are obtained from a single customer. This is synonymous with any Indian Independent Software Vendor (ISV) who has a high client concentration [Client concentration is the industry terminology which refers to what percentage of revenue is derived from a particular customer. A company which has 70% revenues from a single customer has a high client concentration; in contrast a company which has 10% revenues from a single customer has lower client concentration]

CSFST framework has 5 dimensions as listed below:
1) Customer Development and Engagement
2) Strategic Orientation
3) Financial
4) Systems and Processes
5) Talent Acquisition and Development

The CSFST framework is depicted below:

These dimensions form the critical determinants in the growth of a Captive / Near Captive. Each of these 5 dimensions has sub-categories to capture the finer aspects of each of these broad areas for any organization. An organization can face issues along any one/more dimension(s). The ideal utopian state would be to resolves all these issues by developing creative and adequate solutions.

In the next series of blog posts, each of these dimensions are elaborated further.

Extracted from the paper “Crossing the Chasm : Indian Captives / Near Captive Units” published by Nischala Murthy & Rahul Chaubey under the guidance of Prof J Ramachandran, IIMB

Technology Maturity V/s Payment Solution Maturity Matrix

The Technology – Payment Maturity Matrix has been conceptualized to indicate and infer the potential risks associated with an emerging payment innovation

Technology Maturity refers to the stage of evolution and maturity of the technology.

Payment Solution Maturity refers to the ‘newness’ of a payment solution and how much time is required for the solution to become stable and be widely accepted.

From the above matrix, it is evident that the risks associated with a new payment solution based on a new technology are very high. The nascency of a technology only increases the risks associated with the commercialization of a payment solution. On the other hand, if a payment innovation utilizes an existing stable technology; the associated risks would be lower. Combining an existing payment solution with an existing technology so as to cater to a specific customer need (speed for example) has a low level of risk

Extracted from the paper “Retail Payment Systems” published by the author under the guidance of Prof. P.C.Narayan

Key Considerations for New Technology Adoption in Payment Solutions

With the plethora of technologies available to support the latest payment innovations, it
becomes important to bear in mind the following considerations :
1) Impact of technology on consumer experience
2) Investments required by all players in the payment value chain for implementing the payment solution
3) Return on Investment for all the players in the payment value chain
4) Risks associated with technology
5) Maturity of the technology
6) Stage of Commercialization of the technology
7) Maturity of the payment solution

While technology plays a key role in the payment solution space, it must be remembered
that technology itself is not a panacea. A technology solution must address a distinct set
of requirements which are focused on solving the needs of customers, merchants and
financial institutions.

Extracted from the paper “Retail Payment Systems” published by the author under the guidance of Prof. P.C.Narayan

Social Media Legacy

At some point in life, we all ask ourselves “What is the legacy I will leave behind?” And typically, the initial response for many of us revolves around financial assets. I had written a blog “What’s the legacy you’ll leave behind?” But the thought continued to linger on….

And then looking around me, I realized that many of us spend significant amount of our daily time online – especially on Social Media platforms [Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, etc]… So would it not be relevant to plan to leave a legacy of your Social Media presence? Whom you leave that legacy to is a personal choice and How much they will value it is a secondary consideration… Nevertheless, if you are serious about creating a social media legacy, plan for it and objectively work on it – 10, 20, 30 years from now you would have built a rich social media estate… And it’s never too late to start building your social media legacy. In fact, I was pleasantly surprised to find that there are even companies which are offering services to define your personal online legacy based on your social media presence @ http://www.socialmedialegacy.com/

And if you are wondering what legacy you can leave behind, a few ideas below to get you started:
• A blog on a specific subject which you are passionate about / which you are experienced about / which you are knowledgeable about – Could range from marketing to innovation to spirituality to technology to stories to jokes to leadership to branding to art to communication to….
• A collection of inspirational quotes on Twitter
• A photo blog about a subject of your interest
• A blog about family recipes and traditions
• A blog about all that you learnt in school & what you did not learn in school
• A parenting blog
• A blog about your life – Sharing wisdom that you have accumulated over the years – And this is something which everyone can do….

So, do you want to leave a social media legacy for someone????

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