Corporate Communication 101 | The Do’s and Don’ts

Corporate Communication is an important channel of communication within any organization. It is probably the fastest and most cost-effective channel for efficient and effective one-many information exchange. Many organizations use corporate communication “mails” to share news, views, achievements, highlights, milestones and general organization updates which employees need to know on a regular basis. Now whether employees read or not – That is the topic for another post (or debate)

Having been responsible for several kinds of “E-Mail” Corporate Communication for the past several years, and seen what works and what does not, I’m sharing in this post DO’s and DO NOT’s. This is based on my personal experience.

DO’s

1) Be clear on what you want to say and the key messages from a communication. If you are not clear, there is a chance that the reader does not understand either. More often than not, the problem starts here!

2) Be clear on the target reader and how he / she consumes content (typically). Customize your communication accordingly (format / tone / style / language /  channel)

3) The Subject / Headline is the most critical. It can be the only reason (again most times) as to why someone will read your communication. Keep it short, relevant and interesting

4) Structure your content into smaller sections. It is improves readability significantly, and ensures more eye-balls.

5) Keep the content crisp, concise and clear

6) Highlight in one / more ways the key messages (Use bold / italics / different color) in your communication. So if any reader glances through your communication, they should get the gist by looking at the highlights.

7) Time it right – Send your communication at a time when the probability of reading it is the highest

8) Use images / videos / visuals in your communication – They are easier to read and comprehend, and usually get more readership than “text-only” communications

9) Check for spelling / grammar / format / consistency – Basic sanity check and what you learned in high school

10) Give the mail of whom anyone can get in touch with, should they have any questions / feedback

11) If you get a query / feedback on a corporate communication, be sure to respond. If you don’t have an answer, acknowledge that you’d received the communication and will respond shortly

12) Ensure that the information is 100% correct. Have supporting data to back-up your communication. If you have referenced (part of) content from a public source, share the reference in the communication itself

13) Use quotes / testimonials to make / emphasize on a point. Take necessary permissions before you share

14) Ensure that there is a critical peer-review of your content – for accuracy, consistency, correctness of language / words / messaging

15) Get all the necessary approvals before you publish. It is better to be safe and delay a communication, than to be sorry

Most importantly, Make it easy to read and comprehend. That is why you are communicating right?

DO NOT’s

1) Make spelling mistakes

2) Use abusive language

3) Make controversial statements (unless you want to rake up a controversy)

4) Send false / incorrect information

5) Share information with people who should not / need not know

6) Share wrong / incorrect information

7) Keep the communication long

8) Use text and colors which are difficult on the eyes

9) Use vernacular languages if English is the de-facto official business language in your work environment

10) Make personal comments / remarks on anyone (whatever be the background / history)

11) Keep it cryptic – Unless you don’t want others to understand (BUT Why then are you sending a communication)

12) Assume that everyone knows everything. In any cross-section of readers, some may know and some may not know

13) Send the same communication 10 times in a span of 5 minutes. Technology glitch / manual error – This is usually not well recieved

14) Send incomplete information.

You’d think all of above was pure common-sense, and anyone would know. I agree. But looks like common-sense is hard to find, hence this post. What has been your experience with corporate communications? Good / Bad / Ugly – Leave a comment to let me know

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